Tag Archives: Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)

Caribbean voices joining global Internet debate

The Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)—the entity that controls key bits of the Internet—gathers in Los Angeles this week to tackle an array of hot issues, in particular, governance of the Internet.

“Governments want to exert control over the sweeping transnational power of the Internet that is affecting their policies, politics, social fabric and/or their economic conditions,” ICANN chief executive Fadi Chehade told the media, days before this week’s ICANN 51 meeting, which will continue through October 16.

The dynamic between ICANN’s policies and the national or international laws regulating human society is complex, and is overseen by a dedicated committee within ICANN. “ICANN receives input from governments through the Governmental Advisory Committee, or GAC,” explained Albert Daniels, ICANN’s stakeholder engagement manager for the Caribbean. Continue reading Caribbean voices joining global Internet debate

Curacao to host CaribNOG 8/LACNIC Caribbean 6

curaçao flagOne of the largest gatherings of the Caribbean Internet community will take place in Curacao in a few weeks.

In September, the Caribbean Network Operators Group (CaribNOG) and the Latin American and Caribbean Internet Addresses Registry (LACNIC) will co-host a regional forum where important issues related to the future of the Internet at a regional and global level will be discussed.

CaribNOG 8/LACNIC Caribbean 6 will provide a forum for technology industry specialists to meet, network and get specialised training. The highly-anticipated event is widely regarded as a solutions-oriented forum for regional technology professionals to share relevant knowledge, deepen practical understanding and develop new skills.

The week of meetings draws on the strength of two organisations that are committed to advancing Internet development in the region. CaribNOG has earned a reputation as a place to exchange information related to the management of Internet and telecommunications networks in the region. LACNIC, an international non-government organisation, is one of the five Regional Internet Registries that exist worldwide.

Cyber security, Internet exchange points, data centres, cloud computing and critical Internet infrastructure are among the main topics to be presented by a slate of experts that includes Carlos Martínez (LACNIC), Bevil Wooding (PCH), Mark Kosters (ARIN), Arturo Servin (Google Inc.), Claire Craig (UWI), Steve Spence (Arkitechs), Alejandro Acosta (LACNIC), Stephen Lee (Arkitechs).

The regional event takes place with the support of the wider global Internet community. Among its main sponsors are the Amsterdam Internet Exchange (Ams-IX), the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), the Caribbean Telecommunications Union, Columbus Communications, Google, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the Internet Society, the Brazilian Network Information Center (NIC.br) and Microsoft.

CaribNOG 8/LACNIC Caribbean 6 will be held from September 29 to October 3 at Hilton Curaçao Resort Hotel, Willemstad.

“Curacao is a very appropriate location for this event,” said Stephen Lee, one of the main organisers.

The island is one of the few in the Caribbean that has developed its Internet infrastructure to the extent that it is able offer data centre services to a global market, including the southern and eastern Caribbean.

“Technology-based services are an important part of the economy. They have modern high-speed connectivity, and there are some major fibre connections into the island that enable them to support the delivery of those services.”

More information is available on the official event website.

Missing the boat: The problem of chronic Caribbean underrepresentation

One of the main reasons for focusing on capacity-building in the Caribbean region specifically is that Caribbean societies remain severely underrepresented at international meetings where decisions are being made concerning the development and governance of the global Internet. And for a region already burdened with a number of complex, deep-rooted and interrelated issues, the consequences of that chronic under-representation could be dire.

“The Internet presents wonderful opportunities for social and economic development,” he said. “But if global Internet Governance policies continue to be developed without the input of the Caribbean, then we will not recognise those wonderful opportunities or know how we can exploit them.”

Since 2013, the Saint Lucia-born Daniels, who is attached to the ICANN Engagement Centre in Montevideo, Uruguay, has been working to improve the level and quality of regional representation.

“If the Caribbean does not participate in the global dialogue where important decisions are made about changes in the shape and direction of Internet policy and standards, then the region will tend to remain unaware of those changes, and that is true whether or not those changes are working towards our benefit.”

The irony, Daniels said, is that the Caribbean, because of its geo-politics, has great capacity to affect global policy-making. He gave the example of ICANN’s GAC, which advises the ICANN Board on issues of public policy, especially where there may be an interaction between ICANN’s policies and national laws or international agreements.

“Membership in the GAC comes through accreditation, and there is a seat available for every Caribbean nation,” Daniels said.

He explained that the Caribbean has an almost oversized potential to weigh in on global decision-making processes.

“As a whole, the region represents a substantial portion of the votes available at the GAC,” Daniels said. “At the time that I joined, there were only four countries from the region represented: Jamaica, Trinidad, Montserrat, Cayman Islands. Since I joined, I’ve been able to assist Grenada, Dominica and the Caribbean Telecommunications Union with their GAC membership process, and they are now full members. The CTU has also become a member with observer status, as a regional treaty organisation. If half of the Caribbean countries would participate in the global dialogue, the region would be a force to be reckoned with. But policies are being developed without our input and as a result, they may or may not be working towards our interest.”

Casting the Internet wider

He offered ICANN’s new gTLDs programme as a specific example of how the region could be missing out. The gTLDs are the letters immediately following the final dot in an Internet address. Through the program, the number of gTLDS could expand from 22 to thousands.

“New gTLDs give corporations and regular Internet users the chance to operate under a name of their choosing, which helps enhance competition, innovation and choice. The new domains represent an opportunity for local communities, charities and small businesses to stand out from the crowd,” Daniels said.

“We could consider .Caribbean or .hotel or .rum, any name that a business person feels can create a commercial opportunity, not just at the national level but in the global marketplace. But what happens in the case where you have a commercial entity expressing an interest in a domain name that can also represent a geographic region like the Caribbean? Well, then the commercial entity could possibly get the domain name, simply because our region is sorely underrepresented and doesn’t in the decision-making process.”

Engineering Institute to hold Caribbean Internet Governance forum

Regional technology experts will share their insights on global Internet Governance issues, from a Caribbean perspective, at an upcoming forum hosted by The University of the West Indies (UWI). Internet governance deals with the development of shared principles, policies and programmes that shape the use and evolution of the Internet.

“In the global, multi-stakeholder Internet Governance model, the Internet is seen as a borderless resource belonging to no single entity. Instead, it is managed by a global community of governments, corporations, technologists, academics, civil society and individual end users,” said Patrick Hosein, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computing and Information Technology at UWI, St Augustine.

This multi-stakeholder model is used by the Trinidad and Tobago Network Information Centre (TTNIC), the Registry for the .tt ccTLD, of which Hosein is the CEO. He also chairs the Computer and Communications Society (CCS) of the Trinidad and Tobago Section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEETT), which is sponsoring the forum in association with the Trinidad and Tobago chapter of the Internet Society (ISOCTT) and the TTNIC.

Speakers at the forum will deliver interactive presentations and answer participants’ questions about Internet Governance. The ultimate aim is to strengthen the Caribbean presence in international fora where the future of the Internet is being determined.

Speakers at the forum include Tracy Hackshaw, ICANN GAC vice chair; Cintra Sooknanan ISOCTT president; Jacqueline Morris, member of the multi-stakeholder advisory group of the TTNIC; and Albert Daniels, ICANN Global Stakeholder Engagement Manager for the Caribbean. This forum is being held during the same week as the South School on Internet Governance which will provide more intense training on Internet Governance to a select number of fellows.

The forum starts at 6.30 pm on May 1st and will be held in Room 101 of the Faculty of Engineering at the UWI, St Augustine. Registration is free and open to the public.

IEEETT CCS plans to hold a second seminar on 5G networks later this year.

More information is available from the  IEEETT CCS Society secretary.

The Caribbean region and the global Internet: David and Goliath 2.0

Albert Daniels, ICANN Manager, Caribbean
Albert Daniels, ICANN Manager, Caribbean

Caribbean societies remain severely underrepresented at international meetings where decisions are being made concerning the development and governance of the global Internet. And for a region already burdened with a number of complex, deep-rooted and interrelated issues, the consequences of that chronic under-representation could be dire.

“The Internet presents wonderful opportunities for social and economic development,” said Albert Daniels, Caribbean-area manager for the Stakeholder Engagement Team of the Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN).

“But if global Internet Governance policies continue to be developed without the input of the Caribbean, then we will not recognise those wonderful opportunities or know how we can exploit them.” Continue reading The Caribbean region and the global Internet: David and Goliath 2.0

ICANN Roadshow comes to Trinidad and Tobago

Albert Daniels, ICANN Caribbean-area Manager, Global Stakeholder EngagementLocal and regional technology experts will gather in Port of Spain, Trinidad later this month to share their knowledge with participants in a roadshow organised by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)

The roadshow will be the first such ICANN event in the Caribbean and it is expected to attract a wide cross-section of participants ranging from academia and technical communities, to corporations, government representatives, civil society and end users.

“We are extremely proud to break new ground in bringing the LAC-i-Roadshow to Trinidad and Tobago,” said Albert Daniels, Caribbean-area manager for ICANN’s Global Stakeholder Engagement team. 

The event, which takes place at the Hilton Hotel, St Ann’s, will start at 8.30 am on April 25.

The LAC-i-Roadshow is designed to raise awareness across the region on key topics related to the transition to IPv6, the impact of the new generic top level domain (gTLD) program, and the security and stability of critical Internet infrastructure.

Besides Daniels, other ICANN representatives expected to present are Tracey Hackshaw, Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) vice chair, and Dev Anand Teelucksingh, At Large Advisory Committee (ALAC) member.

Speakers are also drawn from regional registries and local organisations which work together to maintain the global interoperability of the Internet. Presentations will be made by representatives of The Caribbean Telecommunications Union (CTU), the Regional Internet Registry for the Latin American and Caribbean regions (LACNIC), the Caribbean Network Operators Group (CaribNOG), and the Trinidad and Tobago Network Information Centre (TTNIC).

“There will be four editions of the LAC-i-Roadshow per year in the Caribbean, the Andean region, Central America and South America,” said Daniels.

Continue reading ICANN Roadshow comes to Trinidad and Tobago

U.S. to relinquish key internet stewardship function

The U.S. government has announced its intention to divest itself of the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions. On March 14, the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) declared its intent to transitionthe stewardship of key Internet domain name functions to the global, multistakeholder community.

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) was asked by the U.S. government to lead a process for a global multistakeholder community dialogue about what this transition will entail and how it will proceed. ICANN has since launched a process to transition the role of the United States Government relating to the Internet’s unique identifiers system, a release on the organisation’s website said.

 

The Internet’s unique identifier functions are not apparent to most Internet users, but they play a critical role in maintaining a single, global, unified and interoperable Internet. IANA functions involve the coordination of those unique Internet identifiers. These include allocating Internet Numbers in cooperation with the Regional Internet Registries, administration of the DNS root zone, and coordination of root zone management. The IANA functions are administered by ICANN. Continue reading U.S. to relinquish key internet stewardship function